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Old PC build details

Before my new i7 PC, I had a Dual Core AMD Athlon 64 X2 4000+ processor that runs (apparently) at 2.1 GHz. It had 3 x 1gb chips of OCZ DDR2 800MHz memory (I would have had 4, but when I upgraded my CPU cooler - the 4th chip wouldn't fit anymore). I believe 2 chips are "titanium" and one is "gold", with the better 2 having slightly better timmings.

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Cooler and Cooling

The CPU cooler is an Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro Rev 2. A fantastic cooler, runs pretty quietly all the time (much quieter than the stock AMD one), looks fantastic too. You can hear when it increased its revs from 50 to 66%, but it isn't too obtrousive [sp]. Other cooling in my case is provided by a 120mm Arctic Cooling F12. Very quiet, very good looking. I have had many fans in my time, at one point having 3 transparent 120mm's with blue LEDs in them. Looked great, moved a lot of air, but were very noisy. My Operating System is Windows 7 Ultimate.

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HDD's

Storage is provided by 2 x 1TB Samsung Spinpoint F3's. Bought these for about £40-£45 each, and at the time of writing this they are worth over £100 due to the flooding around the factories of Western Digital and Hatachi etc. Power supply is an OCZ 400w Stealth (2?), which is fine at the moment, and powers the graphics card great - but does not have and 8 pin CPU socket, which an i7 needs more than a Dual Core AMD. Title image

Graphics Card

My graphics card is my favourite part of this build, an XFX ATI Radeon HD6850 (1gb GDDR5). At first this was a rather noisy card. However, after finding that I could manually control the fan temperature though the CCC (Catalyst Control Centre) AMD/ATI application, it is much more bearable. I do not believe it is significantly noisier than the rest of my computer now, but I will have to be careful if I start gaming to remember to manually turn up the fan setting. This card is connected to 2 Samsung 2033HD displays (20") via a HDMI cable and DVI-I to HDMI cable. The HD6850 is powered by one 6 pin power plug. The little 400w PSU suprisingly has a 6+2 power for PCIe cards.

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Board

Thats pretty much all there is to this pc, the motherboard is an old Jetway M26GT3, and has been fine I suppose, but is Micro ATX - so rather cramped. It has 2 PCI slots which is good for the dual gigabit LAN cards, and PCIe for the graphics card. There are plenty of fan ports too, but only 2 SATA ports.. which currently are connected to the 2 x 1TB drives. The poor samsung (£11 from ebuyer) disk drive sits there unpowered and disconnected. However, an old IDE optical drive pulled from my single core eMachines pc functions as a brilliant DVD drive that burns everything I ask it to, and reads everything I can think of. I will be sad to see it go, and might see if I can't take it's faceplate off-- although I have a feeling the new board I want won't have an IDE port.. No the pictures look as though it doesn't have one. Theres probably adapteres on eBay, but I will cross that bridge when I come to it.

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Other bits and bobs

There are 2 (12"?) blue cathode ray tubes (molex powered) that are activated by a rocker switch. I drilled a hole in one of the disk drive faceplates in a Design Tech lesson, and managed to install the rocker switch there after a bit of filing. Next to it, I have another switch, an electrical key switch. When in the off position, the computer will not start. When in the on position, the computer will start when the start button is pressed. To make this, I simple chopped the wire going from the start button (push to make switch) to the board, and added in the other switch. This was my own invention, and may possibly be carried to the new build. I don't know what case this is, just a metal box. Not fancy, the bottom front USB port doesn't work too well, and both MIC in and out don't have a motherboard header to go to.

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